"I’d explain, but you wouldn’t understand."

doctorwho:

SFX Issue 251 On Sale Now

SFX 251 is here – with a world exclusive look at Peter Capaldi’s first series of Doctor Who! We bring you five collectable covers to celebrate! Plus: all the hottest views, news and features from every outpost of the geek universe!

An unmissable exclusive interview with Steven Moffat! Brace yourself for the most revealing insight into series 8 to date, chatting about Peter Capaldi, the possibility of Peter Jackson directing a story and a sneak-peak preview of each and every episode.

PLUS: It’s not just Mr Capaldi, you know! Choose from these supremely collectable Doctor Who covers! [x]

doyourwardance:

awfullydull:

stiltfox:

gothiccharmschool:

skelepoison-spooks:

IT HAS BEGUN

THREAT LEVEL PUMPKIN

I LOVE THAT THERE’S HALLOWEEN STUFF AND IT’S JULY. YOU HAVE NO IDEA.

I GOTTA GO TO MICHAEL’S LIKE RIGHT NOW

But I’m so broke :(

pokemonpika77:

Guys, this is season ONE of the Simpsons.

I remember when this first aired.



Bored duvet covers now on society6.com

Bored duvet covers now on society6.com

Oh, Jefferson…

ladyhistory:

"A friend of Thomas Jefferson’s, who owned a fine, strong horse, challenged him to a race. Jefferson owned a fat old mare but, surprisingly, accepted the bet. The two agreed on a date for the match. Race day had almost arrived when someone finally noticed that Jefferson had set the date of the race for February 30."

blackmasses:

Visited Stonehenge & got caught in a massive thunder storm. ⚡️☔️

blackmasses:

Visited Stonehenge & got caught in a massive thunder storm. ⚡️☔️

high-school-fling:

spicy-vagina-tacos:

freezerburnt-capsicle:

dontbeanassbutt:

boy, blowjobs sure are a mouthful

jeez, that pun was hard for me to swallow

penis

thanks for your contribution

herbivorexvx:

A young East German punk pounds at the Berlin Wall with a chisel and sledgehammer on November 10, 1989, the day after the fall of the East German Communist government rendered the Wall obsolete.

herbivorexvx:

A young East German punk pounds at the Berlin Wall with a chisel and sledgehammer on November 10, 1989, the day after the fall of the East German Communist government rendered the Wall obsolete.

beingliberal:

The confusion, we can do it in the media: Beyoncé posted a photo to Instagram mirroring the famous “We Can Do It” poster. The photo racked up more than 300,000 likes within half an hour. Beyonce, a self-described “modern-day feminist,” incorporated ideas often symbolized by Rosie in her most recent album, her styling is not very original,there are dozens of “Rosies” on the Web, but in the world obsessed with celebrities it’s a good excuse to remind the story of real Rosie the Riveter. 

Rosie the Riveter,  became a cultural icon that recognizes the contributions made by women during World War II. Norman Rockwell’s image of “Rosie the Riveter” received mass distribution on the cover of the Saturday Evening Post on Memorial Day, May 29, 1943. Rockwell’s illustration features a brawny woman taking her lunch break with a rivet gun on her lap.

Rosie the Riveter is representing the American women who worked in factories during World War II, many of whom produced munitions and war supplies. These women sometimes took entirely new jobs replacing the male workers who were in the military. Rosie the Riveter is commonly used as a symbol of feminism and women’s economic power.

In 1942, Pittsburgh artist J. Howard Miller was hired by the Westinghouse Company’s War Production Coordinating Committee to create a series of posters for the war effort. One of these posters became the famous “We Can Do It!” image—an image that in later years would also be called “Rosie the Riveter,” though it was never given this title during the war. Miller is thought to have based his “We Can Do It!” poster on a United Press International wire service photograph taken of Ann Arbor, Michigan, factory worker Geraldine Hoff (later Doyle), who was 17 and briefly working as a metal-stamping machine operator. The intent of the poster was to keep production up by boosting morale, not to recruit more women workers. It was shown only to Westinghouse employees in the Midwest during a two-week period in February 1943, then it disappeared for nearly four decades. During the war, the name “Rosie” was not associated with the image, and it was not about women’s empowerment. It was only later, in the early 1980s, that the Miller poster was rediscovered and became famous, associated with feminism, and often mistakenly called “Rosie The Riveter.”

MORE INFORMATION ABOUT “Rosie The Riveter” and “We Can Do It” posters.